Search

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23dreams23

Dreams Have A Meaning - 6 - Sigmund Freud - Dream Psychology

Thus, when a husband related to me the dream of his young wife, that her monthly period had begun, I had to bethink myself that the young wife would have expected a pregnancy if the period had been absent.The dream is then a sign of pregnancy. Its meaning is that it shows the wish realized that pregnancy should not occur just yet.

Under unusual and extreme circumstances, these dreams of the infantile type become very frequent. The leader of a polar expedition tells us, for instance, that during the wintering amid the ice the crew, with their monotonous diet and slight rations, dreamt regularly, like children, of fine meals, of mountains of tobacco, and of home.


It is not uncommon that out of some long complicated and intricate dream one specially lucid part stands out containing unmistakably the realization of a desire, but bound up with more unintelligible matter.

On more frequentely analyzing the seeming most transparent dreams of adults, it is astonishing to discover that these are rarely as simple as the dreams of children, and that they cover another meaning beyond that of the realization of a wish.

It would certainly be a simple and convenient solution of the riddle if the work of analysis made it all possible for us to trace the meaningless and intricate dreams of adults back to the infantile type, to the realization of some intensely experienced desire of the day.

But there is no warrant for such an expectation. Their dreams are generally full of the most indifferent and bizarre matter, and no trace of the realization of the wish is to be found in their content.


Before leaving these infantile dreams, which are obviously unrealized desires, we must not fail to mention another chief characteristic of dreams, one that has been long noticed, and one which stands out most clearly in this class.

I can replace any of these dreams by a phrase expressing a desire. If the sea trip had only lasted longer; If I were only washed and dressed; If I had only been allowed to keep the cherries instead of giving them to my uncle.

But the dream gives something more than the choice, for here the desire is already realized; its realization is real and actual. The dream presentations consist chiefly if not wholly, of scenes and mainly of visual sense images.

Hence a kind of transformation is not entirely absent in this class of dreams, and this may be fairly designated as the dream work. An idea merely existing in the region of possibiliy is replaced by a vision of its accomplishment.

 Reference:Dream Psychology : Sigmund Freud

Who's on line

We have 30 guests and no members online

MailChimp Signup

Subscribe to Newsletters
Please wait

We use cookies on our website. Some of them are essential for the operation of the site, while others help us to improve this site and the user experience (tracking cookies). You can decide for yourself whether you want to allow cookies or not. Please note that if you reject them, you may not be able to use all the functionalities of the site.

Ok
X

Right Click

No right click