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Goal Setting for Success - Lucid Dreaming

Lucid dreaming is a kind of mental performance, and you can enlist the aid of psychological techniques developed for enhancing  performance to improve your lucid dreaming skills. Sports psychologists have conducted a considerable amount of research on improving performance. One of the most powerful tools to emerge from their work is the theory and practice of goal setting.

Lucid dreaming is a kind of mental performance, and you can enlist the aid of psychological techniques developed for enhancing  performance to improve your lucid dreaming skills. Sports psychologists have conducted a considerable amount of research on improving performance. One of the most powerful tools to emerge from their work is the theory and practice of goal setting.Goal setting works.

Researchers who reviewed more than a 100 studies concluded that " thye beneficial effect of goal setting on task performance is one of the most robust and replicable findings in the psychological literature." Furthermore, the research has revealed many details about the right way to go about setting goals. Here, adapted from one researcher's findings on goal setting are some tips about the right way to approach learningf the skill of lucid dreaming.

"Exercise: Goal Setting For Success

1. Set explicit , specific, and numerical goals :Goals are personal, and related to both your potential and your demonstrated abilities. Depending on your level of achievement, you might want to remember one dream every night or two dreams every night, or to have at least one lucid dream within the next week or month. When i started my dissertation research, I set myself a goal to increase the number of lucid dreams I had each monthy.This made it easy for me to evaluate my performance  in terms of special goals.

2. Set difficult but realistic goals: For many people, to have a lucid dream is a difficult but realistic goal. For more advanced oneironauts, a more appropriate goal might be to learn how to fly or to face scary characters. Your performance will increase in proportion to the ambition of your goals, as long as you keep them within the range of your ability.

3. Set short-term goals, like remembering a certain number of dreams or peforming a certain number of stated tests per day. Also, plan longer-range goals, such as having at least one lucid dream per month. Set dates by which you would like to achieve a certain level of proficiency, for example, " I want to have four lucid deams by June 1."

4. Record and evaluate your progress: When you reach a goal you have set, such as having twelve lucid dreams in a month, record this achievement. Wehen you reach your goal, set a new one. Or, if you are getting, frustrated because you are far from attaining your goals, set yourself less demanding and more realistic aims. Keep notes and statistics in your dream journal. A chart may provide a more visible record of your progress.

How to Schedule Your Efforts

For best Results How to Schedule Your Efforts For best Results

Many lucid dreamers have reported that their lucid dreams happen more frequently after dawn, in the late morning hours of sleep. A partial explanation for this is that there is more REM sleep in the second half of the night than in the first. Additionally, analysis of the time of occurence of lucid dreams in the laboratory showed that the relative likelihood of lucid dreaming continuously increases with each successive REM period."

To illustrate what this means, let's say that ordinarly you sleep for eight hours. In the course of the night, you probably will have six REM periods, with the last half occuring in the last quarter of the night. According to our research, the probability of you having a lucid dream during these last two hours of sleep is more than twice as great as the probability of you having a lucid dream in the previous six hours. This also means that, if you were to cut two hours from your ordinary sleep time, you would halve your chances of lucid dreaming. Likewise,if you normally get only six hours of sleep, you could double your chances of lucid dreaming by extending your sleep by two hours.

The conclusion is obvious:

If you want to encourage the occurence of lucid dreams, extend your sleep. If you are serious about lucid dreaming, and can find the extra time, you should arrange at least one morning a week in which you can stay in bed for several hours longer than usual.

Even though most people enjoy sleeping late, we don't all have time to do it. If you find that you just cannot afford to spend more time in bed, there is a simple secret to increasing your frequency of lucid dreaming that requires no more time than the usual number of hours you sleep.The secret is rearranging your sleep time.

If you sleep from midnight to 6:00 A.M., then get up at 4 A.M. and stay awake for two hours, doing whatever you need to do. Go back to bed and catch up on your remaining sleep from 6:00 to 8:00 A.M. During the two hours of delayed sleep you will have much more REM than you would have had sleeping at the usual time  94:00 to 6:00), and you will enjoy an increased likelihood of lucid dreaming, with no time lost to sleep.Some lucid dreaming enthusiasts make rearranged sleep a regular part of their lucid dream induction ritual.

For example, Alan Worsley reports that when he wants to induce lucid dreams, he goes to bed at 1:30 A.M. and sleeps a little less than six hours, from about 2:00 until 7:45, when the alarm clock awakens him. He then gets up and eats breakfast, drinks tea, reads the newspaper, mail, etc., staying awake fro two or three hours.At 9;00 or 9:30 he writes down in detail his plans and intentions regarding specific experiments or activities he wants to carry out in his lucid dreams and then goes back to bed, usually falling asleep by 10:00 or 10:30. he then sleeps for several hours, during which he frequently has lucid dreams, sometimes extended series of them lasting up to an hour. Redistributing sleep can be a remarkably powerful way to facilitate lucid dreaming. Be sure to try it. For the small amount of effort, you will be more than amply rewarded. Here is an exercise to get you started.

Reference: Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming: Stephen Laberge, Ph.D. & Howard Rheingold

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