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 sigmund Freudsigmund Freudsigmund Freudsigmund Freudsigmund Freudsigmund Freudsigmund Freudsigmund Freud 

Dreams Have a Meaning - 2 - Dream Psychology

This is not the place to examine thoroughly the hypothesis upon which this experiment rests, or the deductions which follow from its invariable success. It must suffice to state that we obtain matter enough for the resolution of evey morbid idea if we especially direct our attention to the unbidden associations which disturb our thoughts-those which are otherwise put aside by the critic as worthless refuse. If the procedure is exercised on oneself, the best plan of help in the experiment is to write down at once all one's first indistinct fancies.This is not the place to examine thoroughly the hypothesis upon which this experiment rests, or the deductions which follow from its invariable success.

It must suffice to state that we obtain matter enough for the resolution of evey morbid idea if we especially direct our attention to the unbidden associations which disturb our thoughts-those which are otherwise put aside by the critic as worthless refuse. If the procedure is exercised on oneself, the best plan of helpt in the experiment is to write down at once all one's first indistinct fancies.I will not point out where this method leads when I apply it to the examination of dreams. Any dream could be made use of in this way.

From certain motives I, however, choose a dream of my own, which appears confused and meaningless to my memory, and one which has the advantage of brevity. Probably my dream of last night satisfies the requirements. Its content, fixed immediately after awakening, runs as follows:"company; at table or table d'hote.....Spinach is served. Mrs.E.L, sitting next to me, gives me her undivided attention, and places her hand familiarly upon my knee. In defence I remove her hand.

Then she says: 'But you have always had such beautiful eye as a sketch or as the contour of a spectacle lens..." This is the whole dream, or, at all events, all I can remember. It appears to me not only obscure and meaningless, but more especially odd. Mrs.E.L.is a person with whom I am scarcely on visiting terms, nor to my knowledge have I ever desired any more cordial relationship. I have not seen her recently. No emotion whatever accompanied the dream process. Refeclecting upon this dream does not make it a bit clearer to my mind. I will now, however, present the ideas, without premeditation and wihout criticism, which introspection yielded. I soon notice that it is an advantage to break up the dream into its elements, and to search out the ideas which link themselves to each fragment.

Company; at table or table d'hote. The recollection of the slight event with which the evening of yesterday ended is at once called up. I left a small party in the company of a friend, who offered to drive me home in his cab." I prefer a taxi," he said; " that gives one such a pleasant occupation; there is always something to look at." When we were in the cab, and the cab-driver turned the disc so that the first sixt hellers were visible. I continued the jest. " We have already got in and we already owe sixty hellers.

The taxi always reminds me of the table d'hote. Company; at table or table d'hote. The recollection of the slight event with which the evening of yesterday ended is at once called up. I left a small party in the company of a friend, who offered to drive me home in his cab." I prefer a taxi," he said; " that gives one such a pleasant occupation; ther is always something to look at." When we were in the cab, and the cab-driver turned the disc so that the first sixt hellers were visible. I continued the jest.

" We have already got in and we already owe sixty hellers. The taxi always reminds me of the table d'hote. It makes me avaricious and selfish by continuously reminding me of my debt. It seems to me to mount up too quickly, and I am always afraid that I shall be at a disadvantage, just as I cannot resist at table d'hote the comical fear that I am getting too little, that I must look after myself." In farfetched connection with this I quote:"To earth, this weary earth, ye bring us,To guilt ye let us heedless go."

Another idea about the table d'hote. A few weeks ago I was vey cross with my dear wife at the dinner-table at a Tyrolese health resort, because she was not sufficiently reserved with some neighbors with whom I wished to have absolutely nothyingto do. I begged her to occupy herself rather with me than with the strangers. That is just as if I had been at a disadvantage at the table d'hote. The contrast between the behavior of my wife at the table and that of Mrs.E.L. in the dream now strikes me: "Addresses herself entirelyu to me."Another idea about the table d'hote.

A few weeks ago I was vey cross with my dear wife at the dinner-table at a Tyrolese health resort, because she was not sufficiently reserved with some neighbors with whom I wished to have absolutely nothyingto do. I begged her to occupy herself rather with me than with the strangers. That is just as if I had been at a disadvantage at the table d'hote. The contrast between the behavior of my wife at the table and that of Mrs.E.L. in the dream now strikes me: "Addresses herself entirely to me.

"Further, I now notice that the dream is in the reproduction of a little scene which transpired between my wife and myself when I was secretly courting her. The caressing under the cover of the tablecloth was an answer to a wooer's passionate letter. In the dream, however, my wife is replaced by the unfamiliar E.L. Mrs.E.L. is the daughter of a man to whom I owed money! I cannot help noticing that here is revealed an unsuspecting connection between the dream content and my thoughts. If the chain of associations be followed up which proceeds of its element.

The thoughts evoked by the dream stir up associations which were not noticable in the dream itself. It is not customary, when one expects others to look after his interests without any advantage to themselves, to ask the innocent question satirically; " Do you think this will be done for the sake of your beautiful eyes?" Hence Mrs.E.L.'s speech in the dream. "You have always had such beautiful eyes," means nothing but " but people always do everything to you for the love of you; you have  had everything for nothing.

" The contrary is, of course, the truth; I have always paid dearly for whatever kindness others have shown me. Still. the fact that I had a ride for nothing yesterday when my friend drove me home in his cab must have made an impression upon me.In any case, the friend whose guests we were yesterday has often made me his debtor. Recently I allowed an opportunity of requiting him to go by. He had only one present from me, an antique shawl, upon which eyes are painted all around, a so called Occhiale, as a charm against the Malocchio. Moreover, he is an eye specialist. That same evening I had asked him after a patient whom I had sent to him for glasses.

Reference: Dream Psychology - Sigmund Freud 

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